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What Works for People
Inclusive Recruiting and Hiring

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Inclusive Recruiting and Hiring

“What Works” Model

Inclusive Recruiting and Hiring

Authors / Vendors

Various (Seek the assistance of a DEI, human resources or DEI and HR consultancy with setting up an inclusive recruiting and hiring program)

Description

Inclusive recruiting and hiring refer to a broad range of strategies to cast a wide net and engender fairness in recruiting and hiring processes including job postings, outreach, screening, and interviewing. These strategies include writing gender-neutral, race-neutral, and bias-free job descriptions, revamping job descriptions using approaches such as Impact Descriptions, which focus on clearly articulating what is expected at specific milestones and what the candidate would be expected to know (and teach) versus learn, training interview panels to mitigate bias, establishing diverse interview panels, ensuring diverse candidate slates, establishing partnerships with organizations representing diverse talent including minority serving institutions (MSIs), hiring a diversity recruiting firm, standardizing interview criteria, questions and scoring, and mitigating bias in screening resumes and interviewing candidates (i.e., removing names).

A 2020 Glassdoor survey shows that an overwhelming majority of today’s employees and job seekers are specifically seeking out employers who embrace DEI: “76 percent of employees and job seekers said a diverse workforce was important when evaluating companies and job offers; nearly half of Black and Hispanic employees and job seekers said they had quit a job after witnessing or experiencing discrimination at work; and 37 percent of employees and job seekers said they wouldn’t apply to a company that had negative satisfaction ratings among people of color,” according to the Washington Post[1]

Note: An excellent tool for analyzing job descriptions—or any written document—for bias is Textio.com, which uses data science to reveal the hidden bias in your writing and suggest alternatives so you can recruit from the widest possible pool of qualified candidates.

 

[1] https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/02/18/millennial-genz-workplace-diversity-equity-inclusion/

Key Takeaways

Inclusive recruiting and hiring can create a competitive advantage in the increasingly competitive marketplace for talent. It is not about lowering standards. Quite the contrary, it is about mitigating bias, maximizing fairness, and casting the widest possible net to recruit and retain the most qualified candidates.

How Do We Know It Works?

Stefanie K. Johnson, David R. Hekman, and Elsa Chan, of the Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado Boulder, conducted three separate studies looking at the impact of inclusive hiring, with the results summarized in a Harvard Business Review article[1]. The first study found that “when a majority of the finalists were white (demonstrating the status quo), participants tended to recommend hiring a white candidate. But when a majority of finalists were black, participants tended to recommend hiring a black candidate.” The second study found that “when two of the three finalists were men, participants tended to recommend hiring a man, and when two of the three finalists were women, participants tended to recommend hiring a woman.” The third study found that one of the four finalists was a woman, the likelihood of her being hired was 0%; when two of the four finalists was a woman, the likelihood of her being hired was 50%; and when three of the four finalists was a woman, the likelihood of her being hired was 67%.

The results from these studies were what we had predicted: When there were two minorities or women in the pool of finalists, the status quo changed, resulting in a woman or minority becoming the favored candidate.

Moreover, according to a 2019 survey by CareerBuilder Survey, when job seekers feel valued and respected throughout the hiring process, even if they’re not hired into the role for which they applied, 56% of candidates will consider applying for the same company in the future, 37% will tell others to apply, and 23% will be more likely to purchase products or services from the company[2].

 

[1] https://hbr.org/2016/04/if-theres-only-one-woman-in-your-candidate-pool-theres-statistically-no-chance-shell-be-hired

[2] https://www.hirevue.com/blog/hiring/the-business-case-for-inclusive-hiring-practices

Employee Resource Groups

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs)

“What Works” Model

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs)

Authors / Vendors

Various (Seek the assistance of a DEI, human resources or DEI and HR consultancy with setting up a program)

Description

“Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are groups of employees in an organization formed to act as a resource for both members and the organization. ERGs are voluntary, employee-led groups that can have a few members or a few thousand. They are typically based on a demographic (e.g., women), life stage (e.g., Generation Y), or function (e.g., sales). They are dedicated to fostering a diverse and inclusive work environment within the context of the organization’s mission, values, goals, business practices and objectives.[1]

The phrase “Employee Resource Groups (ERGs)” commonly refers to a broader range of organization-supported and employee-led groups that can serve one of more of the following three purposes:

  • Social (Affinity Groups, Identity Groups and Employee Forums): Social networking, social support, community building, and social and cultural events.

  • Professional (Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Inclusive Resource Groups (IRGs), Employee Resource Networks (ERNs), and Employee Councils): Professional development, support, and education.

  • Business (Business Resource Groups (BRGs): Business support impacting business results including product/program/service development and innovation, outreach, recruiting, marketing, dismantling and eliminating barriers to DEI, supplier diversity, partnership development, and other strategic/advisory services.

According to MindGym, ERGs have been funded in over 90% of Fortune 500 companies for over a decade[2]. ERGs have traditionally been volunteer-led. However, given the growing importance and value of ERGs, a growing number of organizations have designated part-time and/or full-time resources to lead and manage them. One company disbanded its ERGs and reformed them as “Cultural Equity Teams,” which share common objectives about creating company-wide inclusion in service of the business strategy, according to MindGym.

 

[1] Kaplan, M.M., Sabin, E. and Smaller-Swift, S. (2009), “The catalyst guide to employee resource groups,
1-Introduction to ERGs”, available at: www.catalyst.org/knowledge/catalyst-guide-employee-

resource-groups-1-introduction-ergs (accessed January 7, 2015).

[2] https://themindgym.com/resources/whitepapers/the-inclusion-solution

Key Takeaways

“As ERGs become more linked to the needs of the organization, their funding will grow, their influence will expand, their impact will increase, and the evolution will continue. ERGs, affinity groups, or BRGs are all about getting people together to thrive and grow. People in ERGs are more productive and energized than their non-ERG counterparts. ERGs are sources of competitive advantage in organizations.[1]

 

[1] https://ceo.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/2013-07-G13-07-626-Making_Business_Case_for_Emp_Resource.pdf

How Do We Know It Works?

In 2012, the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO) in the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California held the first ERG Leadership Summit. This two-day event brought together over 50 participants from 11 companies including ERG leaders in numerous organizations as well as DEI executives. In preparation for the summit, an extensive survey was distributed to all ERG members and random samples of non-ERG employees at two of the participating companies (1,700 employees in total). The purpose of the summit was to learn about the ERG journey through this data and extensive dialogue with several organizations. In “Making the Business Case for ERGs,” Employment Relations Today, Theresa M. Welbourne and Lacey Leone McLaughlin of CEO share their key learnings from the survey research and from the ERG summit including the following:

  • Employee energy levels are higher in the ERG groups than in the non-ERG groups. Energy was defined as the internal force one has to move forward and achieve goals at work.

  • ERG membership provides employees with a more engaging and fulfilling work experience.

  • The relationships made, and work done, provide an outlet for creativity, innovation, and learning that supplements what ERG members are experiencing in their day-to-day jobs/roles.

 

ERGs can represent a “safe space” for employees who find themselves as “one of the few, if not ‘the only one’ in a department or division,[1]” increase retention of underrepresented groups, advance DEI, and deliver business value.

 

[1] Pinkett, Randal & Robinson, Jeffrey (2010). Black Faces in White Places: 10 Game-Changing Strategies to Achieve Success and Find Greatness. HarperCollins Leadership, New York, N.

Human-Centered Behavior

Human-Centered Behavior Change Experience: The Rali Platform and Learn-Do-Inspire Methodology

“What Works” Model

Human-Centered Behavior Change Experience:
The Rali Platform and Learn-Do-Inspire Methodology

https://getrali.com

Authors / Vendors

Larry Mohl, Founder and Chief Transformation Officer and
Rich Cannon, CEO, Rali

Description

In addition to managing their current operations, organizations consistently launch initiatives such as DEI aimed at transforming aspects of their organization. The success of these initiatives relies heavily on employee adoption of productive mindsets and behaviors aligned with the overall strategy. Unfortunately, the large majority of these initiatives fail to produce their intended outcomes ultimately wasting precious time and resources in the process. This failure is due in large part to current approaches that are overly event based, content push focused, and do not recognize the engagement needs of those impacted.

In fact, workplace research by Rali’s founder demonstrated that taking a human-centered approach to behavior change resulted in both an acceleration and sustainability effect. In order to improve the success rate of change the fundamental approach to change needed to be transformed in key ways:

  1. From event to journey—Moving from an approach that focuses on “event planning” to an approach that maps out a journey of activities to create a rhythm of change. Learn | Do | Inspire.

  2. From individual to team—Moving from an approach that focuses on the individual as the “unit of change” to an approach that brings teams together to learn, share, and take collective action.

  3. From telling to listening and coaching—Moving from an approach that centers around telling people what to do and how to do it, to an approach that gives employees a voice in the change process.

  4. From information to action—Moving from an approach that assumes information is being acted upon to an approach that deliberately creates opportunities for practice and application.

  5. From ad-hoc to consistent accountability—Moving from an approach where accountability is left to the discretion of each individual manager to a system of shared, multidimensional accountability.


Rali's Change Experience Platform (CxP) provides an integrated suite of methods and features all designed to drive group-based behavior change that shapes culture and results in organizational impact at large scale. On Rali, change leaders can drive interactive communications, launch group-based change journeys using Rali's unique Learn | Do | Inspire behavior adoption framework and drive media-based discussion using Rali’s proprietary interactive video player. Rali game mechanics such as points and leaderboards stimulate on-going engagement and follow-through. Advanced analytics enables informed decision making and targeted actions to ensure the success of the initiative.

Rali makes tracking easy by providing journey progress data, including the verification of on-the-job application, as well as consumption data for all media on the platform. Going deeper, Rali delivers social insights by providing poll response data, discussion themes, as well as patented engagement and mood index scores.

Most change leaders have a difficult time knowing if their initiative is headed toward success or failure before it’s too late to act. Rali solves this problem using a proprietary “change adoption” model to continuously measure and present a success probability score along with the factors needing attention.

Rali has pre-formatted DEI journeys from Dr. Janet Reid, Vincent Brown, and Dr. Randal Pinkett. In addition, Rali can take any body of content and deliver an environment that activates all the drivers of engagement, behavioral adoption, and organization impact.

Key Takeaways

Rali is a comprehensive Change Experience Platform (CxP) built on a human-centered approach to behavior change. Rali provides a comprehensive suite of communications, structured journeys, and interactive media capabilities that shape culture for initiatives that matter. Rali’s change journeys are built on a propriety learn (gain knowledge and understanding), do (apply what you’ve learned) and inspire (share stories with others) methodology that supports effective group-based learning and applied change. Rali analytics and continuous improvement methods provide rich insights and corrective actions that optimizes the progress of change, the experience of change, and the impact of change.

How Do We Know It Works?

Rali brings together proven methodologies from the fields of change management, social learning, digital learning, and engagement psychology. In the area of change management, the Rali design has been informed by many practitioner and researchers including Dr. John Kotter, Kurt Lewin, Daryl Conner, and others. Social learning methods have been informed by the “Communities of Practice” work of Etienne Wegner on Albert Bandura. Digital learning approaches have been informed by the research and writing of Michelle Miller and her book Minds On-Line and others. The Rali Change Experience Platform for DEI specifically as well as other areas of focus has been deployed widely in multiple industries and has produced measurable behavioral, cultural, and business impact.

Scenario-Based Microlearning

Scenario-Based Microlearning Journeys

“What Works” Model

Scenario-Based Microlearning Journeys

Authors / Vendors

N/A

Description

In “What Makes Scenario-Based Microlearning Content Cutting-Edge? [1],” eLearning Industry, Anu Galhotra, CPLP, describes scenario-based learning (SBL) as “an eLearning training method where life-like scenarios are created using digital media to give context to training content and make the topics more relatable. This training method has also become popular due to its ability to increase learner engagement and retention,” and microlearning as “a training format where learning content is divided into short, focused, single-topic segments. This format has become popular due to its ability to increase knowledge retention and its versatility. Many learners prefer this format because it makes it easier for them to fit training into their schedules.” She concludes, “When these two strategies are paired together, they create cutting-edge training programs that address the needs of modern learners.”

 

[1] https://elearningindustry.com/what-makes-scenario-based-microlearning-content-cutting-edge

Key Takeaways

Scenario-based microlearning addresses the “holy trinity” of skills that every person must be adept in for personal and organizational productivity: hard skills (subject-specific skills and abilities), soft skills (people and interpersonal skills), and situational awareness (understanding how decisions impact the present and the future).

How Do We Know It Works?

In “How Scenario-Based Microlearning Can Help Achieve The Holy Trinity Of Corporate Success[1],” Anu Galhotra, CPLP, writes the following about why scenario-based microlearning works:

  • Hard Skills: “[It] works for hard skills because it presents learning in a story format. Hard skills involve the cognitive part of the brain (i.e. the pre-frontal cortex, which is associated with short-term memory). Scenario-based microlearning creates an emotional and behavioral connection with the learner, which allows the transfer of the learned skills or knowledge to the hippocampus, which is the part of the brain associated with long-term memory. Hard skills involve troubleshooting, research, analysis, and rationale as well as design thinking and the ability to find multiple solutions to a problem, all of which can be taught using short, 5-minute scenarios.”

  • Soft Skills: “[It] also works wonders for soft-skills training, as it lets learners practice interpersonal and communication skills in a safe, virtual environment where their mistakes will have no real-life consequences. By going through the scenario/story as a character, the learner makes choices along the way while getting the repetition necessary to learn a soft skill. Soft skills are behavioral skills that are associated with a part of the brain called basal ganglia, which is impacted when a person makes errors and makes efforts to correct those errors. Scenario-based microlearning also helps learners relate to a scenario or situation, and then make correct decisions in real life.”

  • Situational Awareness: “[It] works great for situational awareness as well. In fact, nothing can prepare a learner/employee for a situation at work better than a scenario where they have to make correct decisions by understanding the information presented to them, the events that take place, and the actions of other characters in the scenario. Scenario-based microlearning, when designed properly, affects the amygdala, which is the part of the brain that is associated with the ability to read/react and anticipate what will happen by looking at what is or what has been going on in one’s immediate environment.”

In “The Brain Science Behind Scenario-Based Microlearning,” Chief Learning Officer, Todd Maddox writes, “If you are shopping for an L&D platform, focus on vendors who embrace scenario-based microlearning principles.[2]” Note: Rali is an L&D platform that was built upon scenario-based microlearning principles.

 

[1] https://elearningindustry.com/scenario-based-microlearning-for-corporate-success

[2] https://www.chieflearningofficer.com/2019/04/10/the-brain-science-behind-scenario-based-microlearning/

High Performance Learning

High Performance Learning Journeys® and the Promote Learning Transfer Platform

“What Works” Model

High Performance Learning Journeys® (HPLJ) and the Promote® Learning Transfer Platform
http://hplj.org/ and https://promoteint.com

Authors / Vendors

Dr. Robert O. Brinkerhoff, Promote International

Description

HPLJ is an instructional design approach that puts emphasis on targeted application of learning to bring about performance improvement and business impact. Promote® is a learning transfer platform that enables you to design and execute High Performance Learning Journeys. Promote® is not a learning management system (LMS), but, rather, a learning transfer platform built on four key concepts – social learning, impact measurement, effective training, and management involvement – proven to support your learners to sustain behavioral change. It meets participants where they are and transforms the learning journey into a virtual or blended learning experience and maximizes training investment.

Key Takeaways

In the Foreword to Improving Performance Through Learning: A Practical Guide for Designing High Performance Learning Journeys, by Robert Brinkerhoff, Anne Apking, and Edward Boon, Dr. Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan, a renowned expert in training, games, and simulations, including the cultural simulation BARNGA, writes (pg. 16) that our “High Performance Learning Journey should begin by focusing on the important work tasks (“Moments that Matter”) that produce valuable outcomes. Working backwards, the next step is to identify skills that are directly related to increasing and improving the value of the results. The final step is to create a series of critical assignments, along with time and procedures for reflection, feedback and application planning.”

How Do We Know It Works?

Research suggests that 55% of learning is due to work activities on-the-job, 25% due to social learning and interactions with peers and stakeholders, and 20% from formal learning, development, and training. High Performance Learning Journeys optimize formal learning, development, and training by providing time and resources for feedback, reflection, and application to accompany on-the-job and social learning and interactions. According to Brinkerhoff, Apking and Boon, the compelling evidence that HPLJs work, have many advantages over traditional, event-based programs and event-based learning journey designs including (pgs. 21-22):

  • “More lasting and durable performance improvement

  • Faster time-to-proficiency for HPLJ participants

  • Convenient ‘bite sized’ learning and application tasks that can fit into the daily work lives of participants

  • Reduced costs in time away from the job and travel for unnecessary face-to-face events

  • Leveraging of social interactions and on-the-job learning

  • Learning and performance improvement that occurs at a more organic and natural pace that participants and their supervisors can manage productively”

 

HPLJ methodology’s results have demonstrated: 81% of participants contribute to business impact, 97% of participants experience sustained performance improvement, and 84% of participants feel accountable for applying their learning.

Global Diversity Equity & Inclusion

Global Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Benchmarks (GDEIB)

“What Works” Model

Global Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Benchmarks (GDEIB)
https://centreforglobalinclusion.org

Authors / Vendors

Nene Molefi, Julie O’Mara, and Alan Richter, Ph.D. and 112 Expert Panelists, The Centre for Global Inclusion

Description

The GDEIB provides a means of measurement, a strategic planning tool, and a set of actions that may be taken at an organizational and individual level, to do good DEI work. It is a free Guidebook with a supporting Suite of Tools:

  • Miscellaneous Slide Deck—about 100 slides that users can select from and use for presentations, training, and other purposes.

  • Assessment Checklist and Leaders Guide. This is a 7-step collaborative process to access the current state of the organization or department on each of the 15 categories.

  • Several training activities. For example, there is a short activity on The Approaches that many find an insightful experiential activity.

  • Several handouts, including an overview, titled Overview, and a selection of two benchmarks per category, titled Benchmarks Sampler. There is also a handout on the 15 Actions that can be given to those who want a “one-pager.”

  • French, Spanish, and Portuguese translations are available.

Key Takeaways

The GDEIB is the well-researched, definitive picture of quality DEI work and includes:

  • Four Primary Processes (Groups): (1) Foundation: Drive the Strategy, (2) Internal: Attract & Retain People, (3) Bridging: Align & Connect, and (4) External: Listen To & Serve Society.

  • 15 Concrete Actions (Categories) on vision, leadership, structure, recruitment, advancement, compensation, benefits & flexibility, community, services & products, marketing, responsible sourcing, assessment, communications, learning, and sustainability.

  • 266 Benchmarks: Average 19 per action in 5 levels: Best Practices, Progressive, Proactive, Reactive, Inactive.

  • Use it to determine the level of your organization and set achievement goals.

 

Use it to measure progress. Compare your organization to proven practices and outcomes.

How Do We Know It Works?

The three co-authors—Nene Molefi, Julie O’Mara, and Alan Richter, Ph.D.—worked with 112 Expert Panelists around the world to produce the GDEIB. The GDEIB Expert Panelists are a diverse group of thought leaders representing many world regions and diversity dimensions. They have experience in at least one of the Five Approaches to Diversity Work in large, medium, and small sized organizations, in a variety of sectors and industries, and from both consulting and internal perspectives. They were selected based on criteria and on the co-authors’ experience along with nominations from many others. After the selection process, they were invited to serve as a volunteer Expert Panelist. They contributed many hours of thinking and editing as we developed the GDEIB and made many changes based on their advice. The GDEIB is based on consensus. Before publishing, each Expert Panelist was asked to “sign off” on the GDEIB indicating that they agreed with the Benchmarks.

Racial Equity Acton Plans

Racial Equity Action Plans and Toolkit

“What Works” Model

Racial Equity Action Plans and Toolkit

https://www.racialequityalliance.org/resources/

Authors / Vendors

Government Alliance for Racial Equity (GARE)

Description

“A new theory of change to achieve racial equity should guide your organization and its plan to make transformative change. GARE’s recommended theory of change does the following:

  1. Normalize—Establish racial equity as a key value by developing a shared understanding of key concepts across the entire jurisdiction and create a sense of urgency to make changes.

  2. Organize—Build staff and organizational capacity, skills, and competences through training while also building infrastructure to support the work, like internal organizational change teams and external partnerships with other institutions and community.

  3. Operationalize—Put theory into action by implementing new tools for decision-making, measurement, and accountability like a Racial Equity Tool and developing a Racial Equity Action Plan.

 

This theory of change can be measured over time to track progress and impacts, both within the organization and in the community. Activities (outputs) can be quantified like the number of employees trained, number of departments with Racial Equity Action Plans, number of times a Racial Equity Tool is used to address institutional and structural barriers, or number of community members partnering with the organizations to advance racial equity. Outcomes can also be quantified by measuring the improved knowledge of racial equity concepts among employees, increased skills to work on and communicate about racial equity, and the changes made due to racial equity considerations being integrated into decision-making structures. There must also be a focus on our desired results in the community; the conditions being aimed to impact. Community indicators are the means by which community is measured, with clear focus on closing racial disparities, and lifting up success for all groups.[1][2]

 

[1] https://www.racialequityalliance.org/resources/racial-equity-action-plans-manual/

[2] https://www.racialequityalliance.org/resources/racial-equity-toolkit-opportunity-operationalize-equity/

Key Takeaways

Racial Equity Action Plans and Tools can put a theory of change into action to achieve a collective vision of racial equity. Plans can drive institutional and structural change. However, the goal is not the plan. The goal is institutional and structural change, which requires resources to implement: time, money, skills, and effort. It requires organizational will and expertise to change policies, the way business is conducted, habits, cultures. Racial Equity Plans are both a process and a product. A successful process will build staff capacity which can be valuable during implementation. A process can also serve to familiarize more staff with the organization’s racial equity vision and its theory of change. While intended to be used by local governments, the theory of change and its associated tools, frameworks, and approaches can be valuable for any organization seeking to achieve racial equity. GARE offers a series of downloadable resources including sample templates.

How Do We Know It Works?

GARE created a Racial Equity Action Plan template after a national scan of promising practices from cities and counties that have developed plans for racial equity and the structures that supported successful planning processes. This process was also informed by the Results Based Accountability (RBA) framework, which is a disciplined way of thinking and taking action that communities and government can use to achieve meaningful improvements, eliminate racial inequities and lift up outcomes for all.

Equitable Analytics

Equitable Analytics™

“What Works” Model

Equitable Analytics™ (formerly Precision Analytics)

Authors / Vendors

Peter York, Principal and Chief Data Scientist, BCT Partners

http://www.equitableanalytics.com

Description

Equitable Analytics™ is a joint social science and data science approach that trains machine learning algorithms to apply quasi-experimental causal modeling using administrative data—i.e., finding naturally occurring experiments in history and minimizing selection bias through analytic controls‑to provide highly accurate, valid, reliable, and tailored case-specific predictions, recommendations, and evidence-based evaluation findings, in real time. Equitable Analytics™ builds predictive, prescriptive, and evaluative models that determine what causes a desired outcome for each segment of a population, equitably. These algorithms are trained to follow the scientific method, including identifying matched comparison groups who share similar histories and contexts that make them equally likely to engage and benefit; finding all the various strategies that have been tried with each of these unique groups; and determining which of these respective strategies best achieve the greatest impact. Put another way, machine learning algorithms are trained to find all the naturally occurring experiments that happened over the history of a program or effort, and then determine which of these experiments proved, attributably, what it was that made the biggest difference, and for whom. Equitable Analytics™ uses Precision Modeling to find counterfactual experiments in history, mitigating the often-biased conclusions of the pattern-based/correlational modeling techniques – often called, “black box” analytics – that unfortunately put predictive accuracy above unbiased truth. Equitable Analytics™ has also been integrated with natural language processing (NLP) to analyze qualitative data, such as corpuses of research and evaluation proposals and reports, and extract findings in a fraction of the time it would take humans.

Key Takeaways

Equitable Analytics™ is a disruptive approach to more precisely identify what types of programming, treatments, and/or interventions are most likely to work and for whom. It can be applied to existing DEI-related data, including employee engagement data, found within a human resources information system (HRIS), learning management system (LMS), enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, customer relationship management (CRM) system, or other DEI-related data system and determine which DEI programs, strategies, initiatives, actions, and interventions are most effective, and with which groups, to achieve a desired outcome. For example, Equitable Analytics™ could identify the optimal mix of strategies to increase feelings of inclusion and belonging in a specific department, division or entire organization, or the optimal mix of strategies to maximize the likelihood of women and people of color reaching the executive levels. In offering these recommendations, Equitable Analytics™ can also provide a prediction of the anticipated increase in feelings of inclusion and belonging and the number of women and people of color who will reach the executive levels if the recommendations are administered. As will be discussed in Step 5: DEI Impact under “Distinguishing Between Correlation and Causation,” Equitable Analytics™ can also help distinguish between where DEI initiatives are simply correlated with DEI results or the actual cause of DEI results.

How Do We Know It Works?

The Equitable Analytics™ approach is the application of the causal mathematical techniques put forth by machine learning pioneer, Turing Award winner and causal modeling author and expert, Judea Pearl, in his book, The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect. Equitable Analytics™ has been developed and applied in over a dozen projects over the past ten years with public, private, and nonprofit organizations. BCT Partners has successfully applied these techniques across several sectors in partnership with various organizations, including to psychiatric residential mental health for children (Gemma Services and the Scattergood Foundation), substance abuse (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), elder care and maltreatment (HHS Administration for Community Living), child welfare (First Place for Youth, Casey Family Programs, Broward Sheriff’s Office Division of Child Protection), STEM education (National Science Foundation), juvenile justice (Florida Department of Juvenile Justice), economic security and wealth (Living Cities), workforce development (NYC Center for Employment Opportunities), and nonprofit effectiveness (MacArthur Foundation), to name a few. These Equitable Analytics™ projects have resulted in peer-reviewed publications, as well as presentations, trainings and workshops at professional associations, institutes, and conferences, including the American Evaluation Association.

Equip

The Equitable Impact Platform™ (EquIP™)

“What Works” Model

The Equitable Impact Platform™ (EquIP™)

(see Figure 5.6 for a map generated by EquIP™)

Authors / Vendors

Peter York, Principal and Chief Data Scientist, BCT Partners

http://www.equitableimpact.com

Description

The Equitable Impact Platform™ (EquIP™) is a big data platform built to assess, evaluate, and study the interrelationship between diversity, inclusiveness, community well-being and equity in communities across United States. Using the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) 990 tax filing data for the nonprofit sector and the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) data, EquIP™ calculates a “Diversity, Inclusion and Community Well-Being Index” for each community as a composite score of the following three underlying measures:

  • Community Diversity—The extent to which the community’s racial/ethnic diversity—for all races/ethnicities captured in the ACS—reflects the average racial/ethnic diversity of its surrounding county and state, whereas the county is weighted more heavily. The more a community deviates from the diversity of its county and state, the less diverse it is considered to be.

  • Community Economic Inclusion—The extent to which a community’s well-being reflects the average well-being of its surrounding county and state, whereas the county is weighted more heavily. The more a community deviates from the well-being of its county and state, the less inclusive it is considered to be.

  • Community Well-Being—The community’s well-being is calculated as the inverse of its Area Deprivation Index (ADI), a research-validated assessment of community health on a scale of 1 to 100 (another relevant index is the Social Vulnerability Index (SVI)). In other words, an ADI score of 75 translates to a community well-being score of 100 – 75 = 25.

 

Because ACS data are combined with IRS 990 data on nonprofits, once the Diversity, Inclusion and Community Well-Being Index is determined, EquIP™ can leverage the aforementioned Equitable Analytics™ to geospatially determine:

  • Community Equity—The extent to which a community is receiving the locally accessible government support, philanthropic support, public contributions, social services programming, and volunteerism it needs to improve diversity, inclusiveness, and well-being, equitably, along with recommendations of the optimal mix. Stated simply, EquIP™ can help ensure that communities get what they need, which the cornerstone of equity.

 

Lastly, because EquIP™ can also integrate secondary data sets (e.g., local business data, local housing data, local economic development data, etc.) and program administrative data sets at the site level, it can serve as the basis for analyzing root causes.

Key Takeaways

EquIP™ produces findings, including geospatial data and maps, on the diversity, inclusiveness, and well-being for each community (Census Tract) across the United States to determine community needs, equitably. More specifically, EquIP™ helps DEI decision makers, community practitioners, funders, and donors:

  • Examine the diversity, inclusiveness, and well-being of local communities relative to their county and state.

  • Identify the communities in greatest need, prioritizing marginalized communities.

  • Find the most accessible direct service nonprofit organizations that can serve these communities best.

  • Receive assessment, predictive and prescriptive insights about the types of financial and capacity building support these organizations need to help improve community diversity, inclusiveness, and well-being, equitably.

By tracking these indicators, organizations can pinpoint areas, such as office locations and other geographies of particular interest, that can most benefit from social and economic investment including recruiting, hiring, philanthropy, corporate social responsibility (CSR), environmental sustainability, supplier diversity, and the like.

How Do We Know It Works?

EquIP™ combines the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) 990 tax filing data for the nonprofit sector and the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) data to produce findings, including geospatial data and maps, on the diversity, inclusiveness, well-being and equity of communities, down to the Census Tract. Because ACS data are combined with IRS 990 data on nonprofits, it can also produce geospatial data on how much government support, philanthropic support, public contributions and volunteerism are supporting 70,000+ communities (Census Tracts) in the U.S. through 325,000+ nonprofit service providers, including by type of service provision according the 18 nonprofit service types of the National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE), which includes healthcare, education, food, housing, environment, human services, arts and culture, and more. EquIP™ then leverages BCT’s aforementioned Equitable Analytics™ to geospatially measure and evaluate the impact of funding streams and program output, down to the Census Tract. Specifically, EquIP™ can produce data on how much locally accessible program output (expenditures in dollars) every nonprofit and all combined/in aggregate are producing for every community (Census Tract), uniquely, in the U.S., which can be leveraged to measure the longitudinal effect of public and philanthropic investments on those communities.

There are many research studies and use cases for EquIP™; for example, the platform has been used by a workforce development board in Northwest Pennsylvania (NWPA JobConnect) to understand what types of access to jobs (businesses) will most benefit disadvantaged communities, so employers can target their human resource recruitment efforts to these communities; by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, to understand the community factors, including inequities, that are associated with high rates of adult abuse, neglect, and maltreatment; by a regional community foundation (Rochester Area Community Foundation) to offer a free tool to find and support local nonprofits that are closest to the neighborhoods that have the greatest needs and inequities; by BCT Partners to provide a free tool for funders and individual donors to find nonprofits that serve vulnerable communities during the COVID-19 pandemic; and by a nonprofit capacity building organization in Pittsburgh, PA (PACE) to conduct a study of inequities in philanthropic, volunteer, and capacity building support for nonprofit organizations serving communities of color throughout the region.

Supplier Diversity

Supplier Diversity Benchmark Framework

“What Works” Model

Supplier Diversity Benchmark Framework
https://www.supplier.io

Authors / Vendors

supplier.io, MSDUK and Accenture

Description

The Supplier Diversity Benchmark Framework is a useful framework for evaluating and benchmarking a supplier diversity program. The framework entails the following ten categories:

  1. Business Case—While the vision behind a supplier diversity program has broad support, a formal business case is key to make progress and commit resources and visibility. A clearly articulated and established business case remains the essential foundation of successful supplier diversity programs today.

  2. Leadership Commitment— Leadership endorsement of supplier diversity is critical and provides a solid foundation for the program. Active engagement of senior leadership within the organization determines the overall success of the program.

  3. Program Infrastructure— Financial, operational, and organizational support are critical pillars of a successful program. Programs that start with the right intent can fail to deliver results because of inadequate resource allocation, lack of tools, and insufficient integration with operational processes.

  4. Policy & Process—Supply chain teams today are distributed across regions and business units. To scale supplier diversity efforts, it is essential to embed supplier diversity in every sourcing process and support it with standard policies, frameworks, and processes.

  5. Tools & Training—Sourcing teams juggle many competing priorities. Companies must remove hurdles to the implementation of supplier diversity practices to increase adoption. Supplier diversity training, tools, and technology should be easily and widely available and integrated into daily work processes to help teams perform effectively and deliver results.

  6. Measuring Output—Measuring results is critical to tracking progress of supplier diversity programs. Measurement must include quantitative metrics that track spending and impact, and qualitative measures that track program health and adoption.

  7. Tier 2—For many diverse businesses, the real opportunities are down the supply chains. Tier 2 initiatives amplify the reach of supplier diversity by asking suppliers to also do business with diverse companies.

  8. Marketing Communications—Supplier diversity programs must actively market their programs, both internally and externally. Awareness of the program and its benefits for suppliers and the company attracts suppliers and builds momentum within the company.

  9. Advocacy & Engagement—Advocacy organizations play an important role in helping companies implement successful Supplier Diversity programs. They offer access to knowledge, best practices, and networks of diverse businesses and other program managers.

  10. Supplier Development—Supplier Diversity is not only about identifying diverse suppliers that are ready to supply – it's about investing in and developing your future supply chain.

Supplier.io conducts an annual survey and produces an annual “State of Supplier Diversity” report that can be used for benchmarking purposes.

Key Takeaways

In their 2021 “State of Supplier Diversity Report,” supplier.io states, “Supplier diversity programs are coming to the forefront and becoming more widely adopted. Companies must take advantage of the current momentum and corporate support to rapidly implement strategies, policies, procedures, and practices that lay the groundwork for sustainable programs. Such programs have the power to deliver measurable economic benefits to both corporations and diverse communities.” The Supplier Diversity Benchmark Framework enables organizations to noy only evaluate the effectiveness of their programs but also benchmark them against industry data and findings through supplier.io’s annual survey and reports.

How Do We Know It Works?

Every year, supplier.io surveys supplier diversity professionals across all industries (in June 2021, they received 177 responses to their survey). Respondents are a varied mix of small and big companies across various industries. Their comprehensive survey covers questions, some multiple-choice and some open-ended, that address a variety of supplier diversity topics including diversity categories tracked, existence of a formal program, program longevity, leadership support, maturity, and procurement spend, to name a few. The results are published an annual “State of Supplier Diversity Report.”

If you have a “What Works” model that has already worked for you or your organization, please submit it here so that we can share it.

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